Tag Archives: coronavirus

Invisible Enemy

These days, I find myself staring at covid-19. I’m constantly reminded of the invisible enemy from radio/television commercials, texts from family members, endless zoom meetings, working from home, face masks or no face masks, six feet stickers or tape everywhere I look. I’m sure you’re facing the same. We are all faced with this and each determining their new routines.

Let’s take a step back and look at Polio.

That’s right Polio – it’s a highly infectious viral disease that largely affects children under the age of 5. It can be transmitted person-to-person mainly through faecal-oral route or less common vehicles like contaminated water, according to the World Health Organization. There is no cure for Polio but it can be prevented with the Polio vaccine given multiple times can protect a child. One reason why vaccines are so important.

What does Polio have to do with Covid-19?

As mentioned, there is no cure for Polio as it is a viral disease. Coronavirus is a virus, as of now has no cure for. Polio has been around since the Egyptian time period with a major break through, (by major I mean a 99% reduction in cases), was made in 1988. Back then, Parents had their children keep distance from others. They went through much of what we are going through now. I’m sure they too had similar fears like we do today, yet they prevailed.

Now What?

We must be strategic about how we interact with one another. Start thinking, is a hug harmless? Is the risk of exposure worth it? Wearing a face mask, keeping 6ft apart and most of all washing hands are just the tip of the iceberg for precautionary measures. Is it a 100% guarantee we won’t contract the virus? No, its recommendations to slow the spread. Whatever this virus is, it’s not going away any time soon. That means we need to do our part in protecting ourselves, now is the time to be selfish for our own health.

‘Til Next Time.

-WN

P.S. – I’ve started a new book that is supposed to help me be a better writer. So, I hope you’re enjoying them so far. The book is called Write Blog Posts Readers Love by Henri Junttila

Human Touch

Experiencing the new normal is almost comical but also kinda depressing. My boss personally delivered a sweet surprise to me for my hard work. She handed it to me and stepped back – we’d normally hug during this type of exchange. We kind of just laughed about the “air hug.” The exchange was a tad bit awkward because neither one of us really knew each other’s comfortable level.

Let’s be real, nothing and I mean nothing can replace human touch. It’s something we all crave. Think about it, babies longed to be held they often cry. When you hold them sometimes it calms them, because human touch is security or its supposed to be. My nibbling’s often want to be held or cuddled with when they go to bed or have a night terror.

Physical touch with another human cannot be replicated.

I’ve gone to the office a handful of times but have kept my distance from the skeleton crew. Today was a tad differently as I had to help IT locate equipment to fix some technical issues. I get into the office and immediately take off my mask while IT puts their mask on. Now I feel awkward…

I don’t care for wearing my mask but I wear one to protect myself from passing it on to my nibblings. I’ve noticed that as my city continues to reopen that less and less people are wearing masks. I get that wearing a mask is uncomfortable and kinda awkward but is it better to be proactive than not? I mean everyone who bought all the toilet paper says proactive is better.

Til Next Time

-WN

Staycation

A few weeks ago I wrote about Blurred Lines and Cabin Fever. I’d like to revisit the same sort of topic/theme. Why? Well, I went to the office today to pick up some supplies and realized how much I miss being in the office.

*gasp* But I thought you liked working from home!? You even said how much you enjoy making hot lunches and having no commute to work.

Let me be clear, I do thoroughly enjoy working from home. There are far too many benefits. Just to name a few: No commute, Pj pants, hot lunch, my cat, my own bathroom, no parking/traffic hassle, no office phone requests, etc…

Here’s what I really miss about working in the office. I miss being able to distinguish when I am working and when I am home relaxing. Often I feel compelled to work earlier or later than my normal working hours. Today, I have felt extra anxious about my work duties vs. home life. I believe this is the first sign that I need a staycation soon.

Perhaps, I’m feeling overworked because the lines are truly blurred as work seems to always be on my mind. I’m sure I can’t be the only one who feels this way or similar. Stay well folks.

-WN

Advice– Take some time to yourself to truly disconnect from work. Turn off your email notifications. Go outside. Most of all take care of yourself.

Through The Window

I feel dazed as
contact with reality
is partially lost.

Loss of vacations,
In office work,
birthday celebrations,
graduations –
even your touch.

Life is lived in the details,
with no mercy in sight —
This is our great loss.

Anxiety ridden thoughts
I’m afraid of:
being sick,
dying alone,
the end never comes,
no sense of normalcy.

During the bombings,
in the bunker I socialized
we all shared
the same fate.

Uncertainty leaves us
no courage and broken down.

Life outside is
a gamble.
I don’t want to be
that body.


This poem was inspired by two opinion videos I watched on The New York Times where I used majority of the lines spoken to form this Cento.

Messages From Quarantine by Niccolo Natali and Nikola Lorenzin really hit home because we are all at a big loss. We are all broken and living with a high level of uncertainty.

We’re All Grieving. This is How We Get Through It. By Nayeema Raza spoke to me because we all are experiencing a sense of anxiety. Our lives were cancelled/disrupted by this pandemic with no clear vision that this will ever end. This should not stop us in our tracks. We still need to celebrate with each other.

Feature Photo by Norbert Kundrak from Pexels edited in Canva.

day ? — Things get interesting

I only know when it’s Monday and when it’s Friday. The other days tend to be jumbled. If it wasn’t for my calendar being filled with meetings and reminders (Thank Goodness!) for said meetings, I’d be at a loss right about now. My inbox grows daily because what would have been in person conversations have now taken to email.

Fact: Email threads aren’t always fun.

It has been all hands on deck the last few days trying to push out a project which involved way too many hands if you’re asking me but its for a great cause so I shall not gripe too much. Typically what’s supposed to take 4 weeks to prepare for essentially has been done in a matter of 4 days! Long hours plus some time on the weekend to get the project going calls for some interesting time.

Fact: When push comes to shove, the work will get done.

I went back to the Office today to grab some supplies, it was quite nostalgic. Almost like a home away from home feeling. But I think I’m adjusting to working from home, because now I get to use a Yoga ball for a chair (which I’ve wanted to do for a while now). Now in zoom meetings not only will my cat make an appearance but I will be bouncing or trying go maintain my balance. That should keep things interesting. I can’t wait until this pandemic is over so I can finally break some bread with my coworkers again.

Fact: Yoga balls are a blast.

-WN

Day 24-25 | Conceal

The last 24 hours have been something out of a movie. When I stay at home (which I do 90% of the time), its just me. Occasionally I’ll see the neighbors walk their dogs or run around, however they aren’t wearing masks or gloves when doing so.

Yesterday I had to get some milk and eggs as I had ran out. Store shelves are still kinda empty at least for toilet paper and paper towels. Stickers on the floor advising people to keep a safe distance of 6ft at the checkout lanes.

What was more eerie to me was seeing people in face masks and gloves. I’ve seen news articles in the past (pre-covid-19) of cities, in China for example, where people often wear face masks regularly. For this to have gotten here and expand to everyone in public should be wearing protective face masks and gloves was a wake up call.

When I was in the store, I felt a bit out of place — as if I missed the memo. I wasn’t the only one who wasn’t wearing a mask or protective gear, but I still felt like a rebel. Ever since I got back from the store I’ve asked myself should I be wearing a mask?

My mom says I should because I live in a high impact area but she also thinks I should go back home until things calm down. There are only 3 confirmed cases back home meanwhile there are over 1,000 confirmed cases with my area code being the highest hit.

I’m thinking that I just take things one day at a time. I’m sure I can create a makeshift face mask to conceal my face and lowering my chances of getting the virus. I think my biggest fear is infecting my family because I do see them on the weekends.

All for now. Be safe. Stay well.

-WN

Day 19 – 22: Community

There’s no place quite like this. Endless woods untouched by humans. Dirt roads are perfect after a rain storm for muddin. The main roads here don’t belong to cars, they are for tractors hauling cattle and hay down yonder.

Every Sunday, church bells call to these small town folk, reminding them that this is God’s country. Family get together’s beside a bonfire watching fire flies light the night. Summer days spent out on the river jumpin’ off boats or cliffs. Fishin, huntin and cruising the back roads are all things that they’ve done a million times.

When Friday Night Lights are on you know where the whole town is. Cheering on their boys as they face long time rival teams. Post game win or lose the town gathers round a local restaurant to fill their sweet cravings.

Some family roots are deeper than a 100-year-old oak tree. Generations worth of farming and huntin’ on these lands. Some members venture out and grow new roots else where but somehow they are always drawn back to their southern roots.

Once you live in a small town and have some ties to the community you’ll never escape the home-town feel when you go back. ‘Round here we look after one another as if you’re one of our kin folk. In times of tragedy/trouble the whole town mourns with one another or pulls together and searches for hope.

This is more than southern hospitality — a community — a family.

-WN